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 Post subject: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 8:58 am 
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Affirmative action for ethnic minorities in Tibet and Xinjiang has been in place for decades in China. They have come a long way from medieval rule, basic needs are met and people are now well fed and clothed. However, the beneficiaries of special privileges in education, welfare and employment have been edgy, impatient and intolerant. Many locals see getting rid of competition as a way to get rich quickly en masse.

Success stories in Tibet have been centred on the pragmatic, enterprising, intelligent, diligent, sober and frugal ethnic Tibetans. Unfortunately, this has not inspired others to follow their blazing trail. Tibetan entrepreners are reaping benefits from the tourism and mining sectors brought about by rapid economic development and massive state investments such as the Qinghai Railway. Ideally, opportunities from growing pie are sustantial for locals to capitalise on and for sharing. However, sceptical and tradition bound ethnic Tibetans are resistant and unwilling to participate in restructuring and modernising farming and and education. Unfortunately, many educated Tibetans prefer to work in coastal cities where salaries are higher and living conditions more comfortable than to return and serve their people. Migrants do the tasks that local Tibetans are unwilling or unable to accomplish.

Western approach to govern indigenous people will not work for ethnic minorities in China. The Chinese government is too soft and stretched. Its preoccupation with growth and giving freebies to the minorities have created schisms and loopholes for disaffected elements to exploit. Progress has been hampered by rampant alcoholism and deep seated superstitious beliefs, similar to problems faced in aborigines in Australia. While Australia has banned alcohol and pornography in indigenous communities, there is no such ban on the popular Tibetan barley wine. Many accidents, crime, absentism and chronic health issues have been attributed alcohol addiction among Tibetans. One undesirable effect of liberalisation of the economy is more freedom of worship for Tibetans compared to the Cultural Revolution. Many old customs and rituals have been revived as a result. In Tibetan culture, it is difficult to distinguish where Buddhism and supersition begin or end. They may appear to us as regressive, irrational and incompatible with the material world and natural sciences. The paradox between spiritual and material wealth remains a highly sensitive issue in Tibet. Let us not forget that the Dalai Lama accused the government of cultural genocide and his followers have fanned hatred and instigated riots in the recent past.

Having the political will to bring about more equitable distribution of wealth is not enough to overcome many social hurdles. The Chinese central government and local administrators have been careful to tread a delicate balance between economic development and retaining traditional culture. In a free market economy, employers can pick and choose who they want to hire. Some may be prejudiced and are reluctant to employ workers who are unskilled and unreliable. Migrants often help to fill in the gaps in a growing economy facing labour shortages and indequate facilities and services.

Should the Tibetan economy be frozen and secluded to allow ethnic Tibetans catch up gradually? From historical experience, we know that manipulation of economic forces often do not work well because it could be easily abused by local powers. Efforts have been made to address inequitability but it is often easier said than done.

We can empathise with the poverty stricken Tibetan population but not skivers and idealist who want to have their cake and eat it. Those who resort to violence are not much different from religious fanatics and terrorists. Innocent ethnic Tibetan bystanders were sacrificed during the bloody riots. Whether the rioters are aware, they have been used as pawns by foreign backers of Free Tibet who have a different agenda.

That harsh western indigenous policy had worked was mainly because there were not many pure blooded native American, aboriginal Aussies and Maori left to oppose unfavourable policies. In contrast Tibetan officials have leverage in bargaining with the central government. The population in Tibet increased by leaps and bounds since liberation from serfdom because of better economic conditions and exemption from one-child policy.

Image

Han, Hui, Tibetan, Mongol have lived for centuries in northwest China, Tibet and its adjacent provinces. Today, many transitory workers seek better opportunities and then move away after a few years. Chinese minorities in Southeast Asia and other parts of the world have made good against the odds and unfair policies in favour of the natives. Ethnic Tibetans enjoy special privileges and preferential treatment in university admission, scholarships and public service jobs. They must must learn to fish than to expect cooked fish on the platter. Behind each success story is a combination of hard work, patience, maturity and stability.

Read more about Tibetan lifestyle in recent times :
http://www.oneworldtalk.freeforums.org/tv-documentary-a-year-in-tibet-life-of-tibetans-t3038.html


Last edited by orange blossom on Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: China can't apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjia
PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:08 pm 
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No, despite having a generous policy towards ethnic minorities, people are not satisfied and continue to vilify the authorities and vent their anger on innocent victims struggling to make a living. Critics expect quick fixes but omit to mention the complexities of the cultural and political backdrop. History has taught us that forced assimlation could be achieved instantly in contrast to gradual and tolerant process.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:45 am 
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Tibet is "unique" as administrators are always caught in a Catch-22 situation. The government has too many concerns and is working with one arm and one leg tied down by the bulk of the tradition bound Tibetans who are ambivalent about modern education, science / technology and economic development.

The Qinghai-Tibet railway is one example of spin-offs for the TAR economy if locals take advantage of the massive infrastructural development. First and foremost, there must be growth before development, restructuring and redistribution can take place smoothly.

http://www.oneworldtalk.freeforums.org/ambassador-to-china-raby-embrace-growth-tied-futures-t3129.html


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:05 pm 
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The problems of Tibet are entirely different to the problems in Xinjiang and must not be lumped together. Given time, I believe that Tibet will be integrated with greater China as educational standards and standard of living improves. Xinjiang needs a different solution.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 2:42 am 
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Elle:

Quote:
The problems of Tibet are entirely different to the problems in Xinjiang and must not be lumped together.

.....Xinjiang needs a different solution.


Elle, you have written very persuasively on multiculturalism and its potential danger to western civilisation in Europe. What dangers do you see of multiculturalism in China with regard to the province of Xinkiang? Mind you the Uighurs are non-Han and Muslim and are heavily influenced by intruding Wahhabism from the neighbouring Talibans/Arab mujahadeens. The Hui Muslims, on the other hand, appear to follow their Sufi brand of Islam and are heavily influenced by Confucian didacticism, and have live peacefully with their Han neighbours for centuries. Live and let live is a common axiom. The Uighurs on the other hand,....they are on a different dimension and planet! With US egging on through World Uighur Congress (based in DC, Washington), the aims/desires of the Uighurs are always suspects. The self-proclaimed "leaders-in-exile" of the Tibetans and the Uighurs have close ties with the CIA and their interests appear more in line with US neo-cons who are interested in the dismemberment of China.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 9:26 am 
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It is surprising that China's affirmative action in favour of ethnic minorities is a little known fact in western countries, even among overseas Chinese. China does not try to put a spin on its generosity nor does it criticise other countries' poor human rights record.

Although ethnic Tibetans and Uighurs in China practise different religions, it must be noted that the rioters share a common denominator as zealots who use culture and religion to subvert the government, killing some innocent people in the process.
The "freedom" fighters in Tibet and Xinjiang would not have grown in strength without covert foreign funding, press publicity and support. China has difficult tasks to accomplish assimilation and economic issues concurrently, and may need to resort to discretionary powers as well as respond carefully to sensitive local conditions and external meddling.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 11:13 am 
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Quote:
Smalltok: Elle, you have written very persuasively on multiculturalism and its potential danger to western civilisation in Europe. What dangers do you see of multiculturalism in China with regard to the province of Xinkiang? Mind you the Uighurs are non-Han and Muslim and are heavily influenced by intruding Wahhabism from the neighbouring Talibans/Arab mujahadeens.


elle: smalltok, thank you for your kind observations of my comments on 'multiculturalism" and its dangers to western civilisation in Europe. XP12 has provided you with his views and with which I concur fully. For thousands of years, China has already included China's form of multiculturalism into their way of life as observed by the relative harmonious existence of the many minority peoples living within her borders. The following link, provides without a shadow of doubt the success of the Chinese form of multiculturalism.BUT NO ONE NEEDS TO PREACH MULTICULTURALISM IN CHINA. TOLERATION IS SIMPLY A WAY OF LIFE THERE.

http://knol.google.com/k/a-modern-perspective-of-tibetan-buddhism-without-spin#THE_ETHNIC(C2)(A0)MINORITY(C2)(A0)PEOPLES_IN_CHINA(2D)1964_(28)DIVERSITY_WITHIN_CHINA(29)



In fact China is unique in some ways, China tolerates alien cultures and even domination but will manage to sinicize (absorb) that culture into their culture as illustrated by how China absorbed the Mongol Emperors. (Most other nations cannot indulge in this luxury.) This sinicization is occurring in Tibet right now but whether it will succeed in Xinjiang is doubtful. As you have rightly pointed out, that external forces like Wahhabism is exerting powerful forces on the Uighers aided by CIA intrigues. (BTW: Studying the features of the Uighers, I do not believe they are pure Turkish descendants but have a lot of Mongol or sinicize blood in-mix and hence have some common features.) But Uigher-Islam is a very determined and persistent cult because of their Islamic doctrines, and whether they can be handled in the same manner as other minorities is most doubtful. I do not believe that the Uigher-Muslim minority can be handled like other minorities and need a different solution if the PRC are determined to remove this threat from within their borders. The Huis are a group to be monitored and to watch if outside interests stir them up to create problems.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 5:55 pm 
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Elle, thank you for the many links of yours to this forum. Your extensive experience and knowledge are to be commended and will help to stimulate a lively forum here. I seldom find a forum that does not end up with profanities especially when the discussions are political. However, if facts and truths are to be told and shown, then we can have a civil discussion with no one taking any credit. Only truth will always prevail.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 6:25 pm 
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Kebau, BINGO that is what an internet discussion should be, an exchange of views based on facts and research so that others may learn from our efforts.

PS: I assume you realise that elle is aka mbplee on Google Knols. I use elle as an anonymous pen name. Please do rate the Knols that you feel is fair.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 10:26 pm 
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For may readers to this forum, please note that Elle aka mbplee on Google Knols has several posts on topics regarding religions and history.There are well researched and worth reading.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:46 am 
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Kebau wrote:
For may readers to this forum, please note that Elle aka mbplee on Google Knols has several posts on topics regarding religions and history.There are well researched and worth reading.


I Thank you KEBAU for mentioning my articles. A Knol is defined as a unit of knowledge.

elle aka mbplee's Knols can be seen here:

http://knol.google.com/k/mbp-lee/-/1l23x9udotn1a/0#knols

(There are 23 Published articles, 3 Top Author awards, 21,330 page views so far 28.4.10 So please rate the Knols. Please bear this in mind: "all Knol authors are proud of their articles and have spent hours/days writing and updating it, and thereby have a reputation to maintain on the Internet. Authors, worth their salt, cannot afford to be frivolous or irresponsible with their views. Hence all facts are "well" sourced in my articles.")

Let me expand. Knols are meant to be an "Internet Encyclopaedia" for author based knowledge. It is open to anyone who has specialist knowledge they want to share with others. There are still many areas of knowledge that is not well known (as well as much misconceptions,) that can be written about and shared, for example, I spotted one article about "Sundanese" and their beliefs that an Indonesian wrote about that fascinated me and I never knew anything about their customs and beliefs, or how little people know about Tibetan Buddhist, or the "Chinese views" of the Opium Wars, or the Cultural Revolution, or what is meant by,"The full quotation, taken from a speech of Mao's in Peking in February 1957, is:

"Letting a hundred flowers blossom and a hundred schools of thought contend is the policy for promoting progress in the arts and the sciences and a flourishing socialist culture in our land."

Any one who is prepared to sit down, do some research, and patiently write about it can do so, and who knows, it may be referred to by other writers. I encourage all who have special knowledge to write Knols.


Quote:
Knol is a Google project that aims to include user-written articles on a range of topics. The project was led by Udi Manber of Google, announced December 13, 2007, and was opened in beta to the public on July 23, 2008 with a few hundred articles mostly in the health and medical field. Knol has no policies regarding sources or neutrality. Some Knol pages are opinion papers of one or more authors, and others describe products for sale. Some articles are how-to articles or explain product use.

Knol pages are "meant to be the first thing someone who searches for this topic for the first time will want to read", according to Udi Manber. Any contributors can create (and own) new Knol articles, and there can be multiple articles on the same topic, each written by a different author. Because multiple articles can have the same title, readers find a topic by searching, rather than just by title.

Knol has been described both as a rival to encyclopaedia sites such as Wikipedia, Citizendium, and Scholarpedia and as a complement to Wikipedia, offering a different format that addresses many of Wikipedia's shortcomings. The non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, which owns the name Wikipedia and the servers hosting the Wikipedia projects, welcomed the Google Knol initiative saying that "The more good free content, the better for the world." While Wikipedia articles are written collectively under a "neutral point of view" policy, Knol will highlight personal expertise by emphasizing authorship and, like articles provided on Squidoo, HubPages, and Helium.com, Knol pages will contain the personal opinions of the author


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knol


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:20 am 
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China's Ethnic Policy and Common Prosperity and Development of All Ethnic Groups

keywords : interdependence, regional autonomy, unity, unified, right to equality, freedom of religious belief, diversity, non-discriminatory, common prosperity

Full text of the policy : http://www.gov.cn/english/official/2009-09/27/content_1427989.htm

CHINA - multiethnic country

Quote:
The vast territory of China, the time-honored and splendid Chinese culture and the unified multi-ethnic country are all parts of the legacy built by all ethnic groups in China, the (Xinhua) paper said.

China adopted the Law on Regional Ethnic Autonomy in 1984, which greatly accelerated regional development in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and Tibet Autonomous Region.

The long-standing existence of a unified multi-ethnic state in Chinese history greatly enhanced the economic, political and cultural exchanges among different ethnic groups.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-10/01/content_12151594.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:18 pm 
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Richardshow: I do not doubt the PRC's policies for the ethnic minorities. It has been so for thousands of years. But I also know of the spoken or unspoken other policy of the PRC and that is:

Quote:
Depending on definitions, both the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China officially maintain irredentist policies. In particular, constitutionally the ROC maintains claims over Mongolia, and territories now administered by Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, India, and Burma. However, the ROC's claims are not active. The PRC's major active territorial disputes are along the border with India and in the South China Sea.
Outside official contexts, Chinese irredentists advocate for the "recovery" by the government of their choice of the various territories officially claimed by the Republic of China, as well as other territories such as other parts of Siberia. More extreme views argue that China should exert control over formal vassal states such as Nepal, Vietnam, and Korea.


And I have not doubt that they would not allow anyone to challenge them on their concept of China's original empire.


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 Post subject: Affirmative policies create parasites and monsters
PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2010 5:22 pm 
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The so-called affirmative policies whether in favour of the minorities or the majority (such as in Malaysia) are extremely bad public policy. They festers resentment in those who are discriminated against and dissatisfaction in those who benefit from the discrimination as these people continue to extort or demand more and more benefits and privileges from the government at the expense of others. At the very least, they create parasites and often, monsters. Because the government is the government for all the citizens, it must be fair to all and be seen as such. Such policies rule out fairness in government.

Such policies also violate a fundamental constitutional principle that all citizens are equal before the law and are entitled to the equal protection of the law.

China should not adopt western practices or popular madness uncritically. She should continue to follow the Deng Xiaoping Principle of crossing river by feeling for the stones.

Poor or disadvantaged compatriots could be helped by charities set up by the better off citizens, perhaps with the support of the government. In the case of China, well-to-do Hans and others could contribute to a private charity for the benefits of the ethnic minorities who happen to live in the poor regions of China. Such an approach would promote better inter-ethnic relations and understanding, and a harmonious society.

In Tibet and Xinjiang, there are 2 groups of rich Chinese; one is materially rich and the other is culturally or religiously rich. The situation arises from the different focus or priority in investment of time and resources by each of the groups. The group that gives priority to education and business is often materially rich while the other group that gives priority to culture or religion is often culturally or religiously rich. Both forms of richness used to be of circumstances (like where and in which family one is born), but with the Central Government’s programs of rapid development, it is now in many cases a matter of personal choice. When one chooses to invest almost exclusively in ethnic culture and religion and become materially poor, the state of cultural and religious richness as well as that of material poverty is one of personal choice. Clueless or malevolent foreign meddlers conveniently ignore this.

Owing to geographical and climatic conditions, Tibet and Xinjiang have been for thousands of years and still are vast empty spaces, with relatively few population centres. With the accelerated development plans for them and modern technologies, people from overcrowded regions of China could be encouraged and aided to migrate to these regions of China for a better and more productive life. If the population in Tibet and Xinjiang could be increased to 100 million each within the next 10 years, they could become major economic regions of China, developed and secured, leaving the foreign-sponsored secessionists with a lost cause. Moreover, the abnormal one-child policy of the economically-desperate era could be phased out much earlier than otherwise it could. China remains an abnormal society until the one-child policy is ended.

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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2010 8:50 pm 
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Malaysia is an Islamic nation. All Islamic rules therefore apply. Non-Muslims are 2nd class citizens at the pleasure of the Muslims.

The PRC have their own concept for taking care of minorities. They will not tolerate separatism.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 6:38 am 
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Elle wrote:

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The PRC have their own concept for taking care of minorities. They will not tolerate separatism.


Elle, can you care to elaborate on this statement? What has China done to control separatism? It will be interesting to read your perspective, from a European point of view.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 12:16 pm 
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smalltok wrote:
Elle wrote:

Quote:
The PRC have their own concept for taking care of minorities. They will not tolerate separatism.


Elle, can you care to elaborate on this statement? What has China done to control separatism? It will be interesting to read your perspective, from a European point of view.


elle: First, I cannot claim to speak for any group of people. I speak for myself as an individual, as a free thinker. Currently the separatist movements within the boundaries of China are, (1) The Nationalist Party of Taiwan, (2) The Tibetan Gelugpa Buddhist sect, (3) The Uighur movement in Xinjiang, and possibly (4) the Falun Gong movement.

Because all 4 have the finger prints of the CIA, and China does not want an open confrontation with America, she is handling it in a manner that is the least provocative. China has the patience of an elephant and in several of the cases cited, time and a firm grip will be the solution. But I have the opinion that the Chinese sophistication of diplomacy is ahead of many others. This, largely is due to the Confucian and Taoist influence in their outlook on life.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 6:37 pm 
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China's foreign policy advocates for a harmonious global society, but most foreign powers (had/have been), just do not get this Chinese thrust into global affairs. Cold war mentalities still exist, and the desire to see the dismemberment of China. Imagine the flood of millions of Chinese refugees if China should be in chaos. A stable and prosperous China is necessary for a peaceful world.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 9:12 pm 
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smalltok, one of America's strengths is her diversity, but it is also America's Achilles heel. To keep the people "focussed and united," America has had to create 'demons" so you all can throw stones at it like they do in Mecca. At first it was the Nazis and the Nips, then the commies, and now it is China. (Note: only Al Qaeda is mentioned today, not Islam or Islamic. Those words are forbidden words in Washington today.) So until the American leadership are willing to call a spade a spade, the problem will only be swept under the carpet for the next administration to handle. Because such a cause will be a vote loser.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 1:02 am 
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In theory, affirmative action is good because it promises an egalitarian society and help to rectify weaknesses in free enterprise system that invariably aggravates inequality and elitism. In less developed and regulated markets and where charities are confined to religious missionaries, the government has a part to play in narrowing income gap. However, such affirmative action policies must be carefully planned and implemented. It should always include a sunset clause and deadline so that the disadvantaged will not remain dependent and hold back the rest.

Diversity is the source of China's strength as well as a potential weakness when exploited by foreigner intruders. Hence, China has no choice but to manage ethnic relations firmly and unambigiously. China must not allow the country to disintegrate like the USSR.

To gain material wealth first and then use these resources to support and develop culturally and spiritually (religiously) makes better policy. People need to be fed and cloth. As the saying goes : a hungry man is an angry man. Material satisfaction will remove a major source of disgruntlement and grounds for rebellion. Visitors to Tibet and Xinjiang are impressed by government and private business funding of religious organisations and education.

It is a myth propagated by rebels and their western sponsors (USA, Germany, France, etc) that China is culturally and religiously poor. Western audiences have long been brainwashed to think that any information emnating from China is dismissed as propaganda. There are still many who did not know or refuse to believe that the CIA is behind Chinese separatist and dissident movements.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 3:21 pm 
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elle wrote:
Malaysia is an Islamic nation. All Islamic rules therefore apply. Non-Muslims are 2nd class citizens at the pleasure of the Muslims.


The 1971 Malaysian New Economic Policy in favour of Bumiputras is racial and not religious as Chinese, Indian and other Muslims are left out.

http://www.economicexpert.com/a/Malaysi ... olicy.html

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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 3:29 pm 
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elle wrote:
First, I cannot claim to speak for any group of people. I speak for myself as an individual, as a free thinker. Currently the separatist movements within the boundaries of China are, (1) The Nationalist Party of Taiwan, (2) The Tibetan Gelugpa Buddhist sect, (3) The Uighur movement in Xinjiang, and possibly (4) the Falun Gong movement.


By “The Nationalist Party of Taiwan”, are you referring to the Kuomintang in Taiwan?

You are knowledgeable about Tibetan matters. Is it true that the members of the Tibetan Gelugpa Sect headed by the Dalai Lama are practitioners of the Kalachakra Tantra and believers of the Shambhala myth?

There have been allegations that, in public, the XIV Dalai Lama performs only the seven lowest initiations of the Kalachakra Tantra; the subsequent eight of the total of 15 initiations continue to remain top secret. Do you have any comments on this?

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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 4:09 pm 
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lpc1998 wrote:
elle wrote:
Malaysia is an Islamic nation. All Islamic rules therefore apply. Non-Muslims are 2nd class citizens at the pleasure of the Muslims.


The 1971 Malaysian New Economic Policy in favour of Bumiputras is racial and not religious as Chinese, Indian and other Muslims are left out.

http://www.economicexpert.com/a/Malaysi ... olicy.html


I see it as a matter of religion and not Race.

Quote:
Bumiputra (translated literally, it means "princes of the Earth") is an official definition widely used in Malaysia, embracing ethnic Malays as well as other indigenous ethnic groups. In Malaysia, the bumiputra laws are a form of affirmative action meant to provide more opportunity for the majority ethnic Malay population versus the historical financial dominance of the Malaysian Chinese population.
It is generally considered that all Malays are bumiputra and that all bumiputras are Malay. This is technically incorrect, as there are cases of non-Malays declared as bumiputra, and similarly of Malays (who are not muslim) who are not considered bumiputra. However, the definition excludes ethnic Chinese and Indians.

This confusion is compounded by the fact that different ministries of the government may have different definitions themselves. What is not obscure is that legally-based preferential racial bias for bumiputra is built into the Malaysian constitution. In practice, racial policies were a consistent, even fundamental basis for the long regime of Mahathir bin Mohamad, 1981 - 2003, as laid out in his own book The Malay Dilemma (1970).

The Malaysian Federal Constitution has clauses specifically addressing this area. For example, article 153 states that:

"the Yang di-Pertuan Agong (The King of Malaysia) shall exercise his functions... in such a manner as may be necessary to safeguard the special position of the Malays... to ensure the reservation... of such proportion... in the public service... and of scholarships... and other similar educational... privileges or special facilities given... by the Federal Government".
The Constitution defines Malays as being one who "professes the religion of Islam, habitually speaks the Malay language, conforms to Malay custom". Consequently, Orang Asli (the indigenous people of Peninsular Malaysia) are not considered for this "reservation of quotas".

Since 1970, bumiputras have enjoyed numerous legal and economic advantages in Malaysia, including admission to college, positions in government and ownership in business. Since 2000, the Government has discussed phasing out these advantages, and reinstating a "meritocracy". In 2003, the government opened up university admissions.

The legal and economic advantages were intended to reduce the economic dominance that was traditionally held by ethnic Chinese and Indians. Some argue that the advantages afforded to bumiputras are said to border on outright racism. For example, it is required that a certain percentage of stock in a publicly traded company must be owned by bumiputras, opening possible abuses by both Malays and non-Malays. Bumiputras are also traditionally charged less for purchases of real estate property compared to those of other races in Malaysia. However, others argue that the legal and economic advantages were necessary for Malaysia to reduce ethnic conflict and insure that economic opportunity in Malaysia was evenly distributed.


So if the Chinese and Tamils convert to Islam, they, theoretically should have the same privileges.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 4:34 pm 
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lpc1998 wrote:
elle wrote:
First, I cannot claim to speak for any group of people. I speak for myself as an individual, as a free thinker. Currently the separatist movements within the boundaries of China are, (1) The Nationalist Party of Taiwan, (2) The Tibetan Gelugpa Buddhist sect, (3) The Uighur movement in Xinjiang, and possibly (4) the Falun Gong movement.


By “The Nationalist Party of Taiwan”, are you referring to the Kuomintang in Taiwan?

You are knowledgeable about Tibetan matters. Is it true that the members of the Tibetan Gelugpa Sect headed by the Dalai Lama are practitioners of the Kalachakra Tantra and believers of the Shambhala myth?

There have been allegations that, in public, the XIV Dalai Lama performs only the seven lowest initiations of the Kalachakra Tantra; the subsequent eight of the total of 15 initiations continue to remain top secret. Do you have any comments on this?


elle: lpc, yes, I meant the Kuomintang group in Taiwan.

I am interested in the ideology and politics of the Gelugpa branch of Buddhism. But I have not been particularly interested in the actual rituals of the Buddhist branches, hence I will not attempt to discuss the practices within those branches. My views on Tibetan Buddhism are contained within the links below:


http://knol.google.com/k/tibetan-buddhism-serfdom-to-emancipation#

http://knol.google.com/k/a-modern-perspective-of-tibetan-buddhism-without-spin#

http://knol.google.com/k/the-dalai-lama-does-not-represent-buddhism#

http://knol.google.com/k/analysing-dalai-lama-s-address-to-european-parliament#


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:08 pm 
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elle wrote:
So if the Chinese and Tamils convert to Islam, they, theoretically should have the same privileges.


So you agree that, if Chinese-Malaysian Muslims and Indian-Malaysian Muslims in Malaysia do not have the same NEP privileges as the bumiputras, then the NEP is racist and not religious?

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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:16 pm 
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If you "masok Islam" and "masok Melayu" you are Malay, according to the legal definition. If you go to the Mosque, pray 5 times a day, eat like a Malay, dress like a Malay, speak like a Malay, behave like a Malay, you are Malay.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:25 pm 
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[quote="elle"]elle: lpc, yes, I meant the Kuomintang group in Taiwan.


The Kuomintang, a Chinese national political party, was founded in Guangdong Province on August 25, 1912, and is a party to the Chinese civil war, although it had lost control of the Mainland since 1949. The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), a regional political party in the Taiwan Region, is the political organization of the Taiwanese secessionists.

[quote="elle"]I am interested in the ideology and politics of the Gelugpa branch of Buddhism. But I have not been particularly interested in the actual rituals of the Buddhist branches, hence I will not attempt to discuss the practices within those branches. My views on Tibetan Buddhism are contained within the links below:

http://knol.google.com/k/tibetan-buddhi ... ncipation#

http://knol.google.com/k/a-modern-persp ... hout-spin#

http://knol.google.com/k/the-dalai-lama ... -buddhism#

http://knol.google.com/k/analysing-dala ... arliament#




The ideology and politics of the Gelugpa branch of Buddhism is inseparable from their Scriptures and beliefs. It is a very dangerous cult of Buddhism bent on world conquest and extermination of all non-believers, if the authors of the following article are substantially correct:

Critical Forum for the Investigation of the Kalachakra Tantra and the Shambhala Myth

Quote:
In Sanskrit, Kalachakra means "The Wheel of Time ", but it is also the name of the supreme Tibetan "Time God". The Kalachakra Tantra is held to be the last and the most recent (10th century) of all the tantra texts that have been revealed, and is considered by the lamas to be "the pinnacle of all Buddhist systems".

Over more than 25 years, many hundreds of thousands have been “initiated” through the Kalachakra Tantra by the XIV Dalai Lama. Of these, large numbers are illiterate people from India. But even the "educated" participants from the West barely know anything about what this ritual actually entails, since alongside its public aspect it also has a strongly guarded secret side. In public, the XIV Dalai Lama performs only the seven lowest initiations; the subsequent eight of the total of 15 initiations continue to remain top secret.

There is no talk of these eight secret rites in the pamphlets, advertisements or brochures, and especially not in the numerous affirmations of the XIV Dalai Lama. Here, the Kalachakra Tantra appears as a dignified and uplifting contribution to world peace, which fosters compassion with all living beings, interreligious dialog, interracial and intersubjective tolerance, ecological awareness, sexual equality, inner peace, spiritual development and bliss for the third millennium ("Kalachakra for World Peace"). The motto for the whole show is quoted from the XIV Dalai Lama: "Because we all share this small planet earth, we have to learn to live in harmony and peace with each other and with nature." The highly focused, extremely tantric initiation of Tibetan Lamaism thus garners the kudos of a "transcultural and interreligious meeting for world peace".

But are the Kalachakra Tantra and the Shambhala myth truly pacifist? Do they really encourage harmony and cooperation among people? Do they make any real contribution to freedom and justice, equality of the sexes, religious tolerance or ethnic reconciliation? Are they a comprehensive, politically humanist, democratic and nonviolent contribution to world peace?

Over the past few years, increasing criticism has been leveled at Tibetan Buddhism, the history of Lamaism, conditions among the Tibetans in exile and the XIV Dalai Lama himself, criticism which is not from the Chinese quarter. Historians from the USA have begun questioning the widespread glorifying whitewash of Tibetan history (Melvin C. Goldstein, A. Tom Grundfeld). Critical Tibetologists have raised accusations of deliberate manipulation by official Tibetology (Donald S. Lopez Jr.). Tibet researchers have investigated the "dreams of power" that are activated and exacerbated by the "Tibet myth" nurtured by Lamaists (Peter Bishop). Prominent politicians have had to admit the evidence of their own eyes that the Chinese are not committing "genocide" in Tibet, as the Tibetans in exile continue to claim (Antje Vollmar, Mary Robinson). Former female Buddhists have condemned, on the basis of personal experience and with great expertise, the systematic and sophisticated oppression and abuse of women in Tibetan Buddhism (June Campbell). Psychologists and psychoanalysts have investigated the aggressive and morbid character of Lamaist culture (Robert A. Paul, Fokke Sierksma, Colin Goldner). From within the Dalai Lama’s own ranks, overwhelming evidence of his intolerant, superstitious and autocratic nature has been amassed since 1997 (Shugden Affair). Lamaism’s rituals have also been subjected to strong criticism. The humanistic, peace-loving, tolerant and ecumenical intentions of the Kalachakra Tantra and the Shambhala myth it contains have been interrogated in a comprehensive study (Victor and Victoria Trimondi). Biting criticism of the XIV Dalai Lama and his system founded on magic has also been broadcast in German, Swiss and Austrian television (Panorama, 10 nach 10, Treffpunkt Kultur). In Munich, on the occasion of a visit by the Tibetan religious potentate (in May 2000), there was even a split in the SPD, whose "pro-Dalai Lama" wing had invited the Tibetan "God-King" to a gala event. The media as a whole has been equally divided: the Dalai Lama has been accused of, among other things, having an undemocratic and autocratic leadership style, suppressing any political opposition, acting to repress religious minorities; letting policy be determined by possessed oracles rather than through dialog and debate, deliberate falsification of the history of Tibet, maintaining uncritical relationships with former members of the SS and neo-nazis, defaming critics and conducting misogynist rituals. Felix Austria – this criticism seems to have floated by the beautiful mountains of Austria like a slim cloud that hardly turns a head.

Here are some of the points raised by the critics of the Kalachakra Tantra and the Shambhala myth it contains that the Critical Forum Kalachakra is putting forward for discussion:

The secret rites of the Kalachakra Tantra may not, under pain of medieval punishment for body and soul, be discussed with the uninitiated. The “head and heart” of whoever reveals its occult secrets "will burst asunder" and they will burn in the deepest hell. There are good reasons for this, then in the eight highest initiations there is talk of things that stand in complete contradiction to a humanist system of values (Michael Henss – Kalachakra – ein tibetisches Einweihungsritual – Zurich 1985, 46).

The Kalachakra-Tantra is anything but pacifist, rather, it prophesies and promotes a bloody religious war for world domination between Buddhists and non-Buddhists (Shambhala myth).

The text explicitly names the "leaders" of the three monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as opponents of Buddhism: "Adam, Enoch, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, the White-Clad one [Mani], Muhammad and Mathani [the Mahdi]". The Kalachakra Tantra describes them as "the family of the demonic snakes" (Shri Kalachakra I. 154).

Thus, the Kalachakra Tantra is opposed to all religions of Semitic origin, and for this reason has been pressed into service by right-wing radical and anti-Semitic circles for their racist propaganda.

The Kalchakra Tantra invokes a global war between the Islamic and the non-Islamic world in which the followers of Mohammed are presented as the principal enemies of the Buddhists. The original text refers to Mecca, where the "mighty, merciless idol of the barbarians" lives as a "demonic incarnation" (Shri Kalachakra I. 154).

Murderous super-weapons possessed by the Buddhist Shambhala Army and employed against "enemies of the Dharma" are described at length and in enthusiastic detail in the Kalachakra Tantra (Shri Kalachakra I. 128 – 142). Modern Lamaist interpretations of these military arsenal fantasies indulge in spectacular comparisons to the weaponry of the 20th and 21st centuries.

The Buddhist art of war in the Shambhala battles is obviously at odds with basic human rights, and is instead described in the original text as "merciless" and "cruel". "The supremely ferocious [Buddhist] warriors will cast down the barbarian horde" and "eliminating" them "together with their followers". (Shri Kalachakra I. 163/165).

All the participants in a Kalachakra initiation (i.e., also those in Graz) have the questionable privilege of being reborn as "Shambhala Warriors" in order to be able to participate in the prophesied apocalyptic battle as either infantry or officers, dependant on rank. High lamas of particular lineages have already been assigned to commanding positions (E. Bernbaum – Der Weg nach Shambhala – Auf der Suche nach dem sagenhaften Königreich im Himalaya – Hamburg 1982, 252, 35).

According to a vision of the Tibetan Lama Kamtrul Rinpoche, it is the reincarnated Dalai Lama himself, who as wrathful field marshal will lead the Buddhist army into the Shambhala battle (Rudra Chakrin) to conquer all evil in the universe. Propagandists for the Kalachakra Tantra peddle a primitive martyr cult that resembles that of the Moslem jihad warriors: he who falls in the Shambhala war is rewarded with guaranteed entry to the Shambhala paradise (E. Bernbaum – Der Weg nach Shambhala – Auf der Suche nach dem sagenhaften Königreich im Himalaya – Hamburg 1982, 253).

At all levels, the Kalachakra Tantra fosters the postulation of (and negotiation with) a conceived “enemy” and – completely at odds with the original teachings of the historical Buddha or the ethical demands of Mahayana Buddhism – advocates war between "good" and "evil", between the "faithful" and the "unbelievers".

The Kalachakra-Tantra contains a Buddhocratic doctrine of state which is even more "theocratic" than the fundamentalist Islam concept of theocracy, then the Buddhist "Chakravartin" (world ruler) is seen as a direct "incarnation" or "emanation" of the Supreme Buddha (Adi Buddha), as a walking "God-Man" on earth, whilst the "Caliph" is only God’s (Allah’s) "representative" on earth, who does not even have the rank of a "prophet".

At the pinnacle of the authoritative Buddhocratic Kalachakra state, on the "Lion Throne" resides an absolute "Priest-King" (Chakravartin), who unites in his person religious, political, juridical and military might. There is absolutely no civil "separation of powers" here. Those familiar with the constitutional position of the Dalai Lama in traditional Tibet (up until 1959) know that the office of the Tibetan "God-King" corresponded to that of a Chakravartin in miniature. The highly questionable and half-hearted democratization reforms that the XIV Dalai Lama has introduced among the Tibetans in exile would be obliterated afresh through the Buddhocratic, state political consequences of the Kalachakra Tantra teachings.

The right to a Buddhocratic world supremacy is an explicit demand of the Kalachakra Tantra. Here too we find a fundamentalist correspondence to Islamist ambitions to global domination. If both systems are set to confront another as deadly enemies in a bloody apocalyptic battle, then this is a consequence of the logic of their theocratic-***-Buddhocratic absolutism.

Modern Buddhocratic visions for our planet which are welcomed by the XIV Dalai Lama are built upon the foundations of the Kalachakra Tantra. See in this regard Robert A. Thurman’s book – Revolution von Innen – Die Lehren des Buddhismus oder das vollkommene Glück (1999), where the author develops the authoritative political theory of a "Buddhaverse". As early as 1979, Thurman, described by Time magazine as the "spokesman of the Dalai Lama" in the USA, saw the Tibetan religious leader in a dream enthroned as a "Time God" over the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, while the great swarm of notables – mayors, senators, company directors and kings, sheiks and sultans, celebrities and stars buzzed around him; caught up in the maelstrom of the 722 dancing deities of the Kalachakra Tantra swarmed around him just like bees in pinstripes around a huge hive.

In the secret higher stages of initiation the Kalachakra Tantra demands the unconditional and unlimited surrender to the absolute will of the administering guru (in this case the Dalai Lamas as Kalachakra master). The "ego consciousness" and the personality of the initiand are extinguished step by step, so as to transform him into a human vessel for the in part warlike and aggressive tantric deities and Buddhist figures. Hence, the Kalachakra Tantra brings no "ennoblement", "transfiguration" or "integration" of the individual, but rather its systematic "elimination" in the interests of a codified religious pattern.

In the eight secret higher initiations of the Kalachakra Tantra, extreme mental and physical exercises are used to push the initiand into a state beyond good and evil. The original text thus requires the following misdeeds and crimes of him: killing, lying, stealing, infidelity, the consumption of alcohol, sexual intercourse with lower-class girls. As in all the other tantras, here too these requirements can be understood both symbolically and literally. Even the XIV Dalai Lama finds it legitimate for a Kalachakra adept to kill a person under special circumstances, "who are harmfull to the [Buddhist] teaching". He insists, however, that this be "motivated by compassion" (Dalai Lama – The Kalachakra Tantra – Rite of Initiation – London, 1985, S. 348 ff.) .

In the highest magical initiations, what are known as "unclean substances" are employed. The Kalachakra Tantra recommends the consumption of the meat of various taboo animals. Human meat (maha mamsa) is also employed as a ritual substance. It is usually taken from the dead and, writes the tantric grand master and Shambhala King, Pundarika, in his traditional Kalachakra commentary, is the "meat of those who died dueto their own karma, who were killed in battle due to evil karma or and due to their own fault, or that of robbers and so forth who were executed". He continues with the advice that it is sensible to consume these substances in the form of pills. The flesh of innocent people, who have been killed as sacrifices to the gods, out of fear, as part of an ancestor cult, out of desire (greed) or for money, is laden with "unspeakable sin" and may not be used in the rituals. "But which falls in the bowl unasked-for is without unspeakable sin" – and may therefore be put to use. (In: John Ronald Newman - The outer wheel of time: Vajrayana Buddhist cosmology in the Kalacakra Tantra - Madison 1987, 266 f.).

Numerous ritual objects employed in the ceremonies are made from corpses (bowls made from human skulls, trumpets made of leg bones, bone necklaces). A glance at the great Kalachakra thangka (wall tapestry) which will be hanging above the throne of the XIV Dalai Lama during the whole of the ceremony in Graz is enough to convince one of the wrathful character of this ritual. The Time God "Kalachakra" depicted there together with his consort, the Time Goddess "Vishvamata" in sexual union while standing, hold in their total of 32 hands 24 objects of an aggressive, morbid or warlike nature (hooks, sword, machete, drums and vessels made of skull bowls, a scepter whose peak is adorned with three severed human heads, etc.)

In the secret higher initiations of the Kalachakra Tantra sexual magical rites take place, the aim of which is to transform "sexuality" into worldly and spiritual power. The real or imaginary women (both are possible) used in these represent particular forms of energy, whereby age plays an important role. One begins with ten-year-old girls. Up to the age of 20, the female sexual partners represent positive characteristics. If they are older they are regarded as the bearers of the negative energies of scorn, rage, hate etc. and as "demonesses". In the 8th to 11th levels of initiation into the Kalachakra Tantra sexual magic experiments are made with just " one" woman; in the 12th to 15th levels, the so-called Ganachakra, a total of 10 women take part in the ritual along with the master and the initiand. It is the pupil’s duty to offer his Lama the women as a "gift". "Laity" who are to be initiated into the ritual are supposed to offer up their female relatives (mother, sister, wife, daughter, aunt, etc.). One can read in the Kalachakra Mûlatantra that "If the pupil does not hand these wisdom consorts over to his master, in order to protect his family, then [the master] may not perform this ritual." Consecrated monks and novices, however, may make use of unrelated women from various castes. In the secret ritual itself the participants experiment with the masculine and feminine seed (sperm and menstrual blood). In the Kalachakra Tantra women are regarded as mere "energy donors" for the male practitioners and once the ritual is over they have no further role to play (see in this regard Nâropâ – Iniziazione Kâlacakra – Roma 1994).

In the current age, which according to the teachings of Lamaism is hastening towards an apocalyptic end (Kali yuga), the Kalachakra Tantra has a particularly destructive and aggressive character. It includes special rites which are supposed to accelerate the general decline through symbolic acts. "What is Kalachakrayana [the Kalachakra Way]?" – asks one of the leading experts in the field of Tantrism, the Indian Shashi Bhusan Dasgupta, and tellingly answers, "The word kala means time, death and destruction. Kala-Chakra is the Wheel of Destruction."


These are just some of the problematic aspects that critics object to in the Kalachakra Tantra and the Shambhala Myth it contains. They ought to provide sufficient grounds to question whether this ritual can still be seen as having a humanistic, peaceful, tolerant, freedom-loving and ecumenical character. In addition, the Shambhala myth integrated into the Kalachakra Tantra has – insofar as it has been accorded historical and ideological relevance – led to extremely aggressive behavior patterns, megalomaniac visions, conspiracy theories and terrorist activity. But above all it exercises a special fascination for neo-fascist circles and provides a source of ideological inspiration for them.

In the wars between Byelorussians, Bolsheviks and Mongolians, the Shambhala myth was associated with ideas of the return of Genghis Khan at the beginning of the twenties. The Mongolians saw themselves in this conflict as "Shambhala warriors". Their military actions were extremely bloodthirsty.

The Italian fascist and right-wing extremist philosopher of culture, Julius Evola, saw in the mythic realm of Shambhala the esoteric center of a sacred warrior caste and suspected that the palace of the world king, whose escutcheon was the swastika, could be found there. He held lectures on these views for the the SS “Ahnenerbe”.

In the occult literature (the "Nazi mysteries”), "masters" from Shambhala are depicted as the hidden string pullers who are supposed to have participated in the "magical" creation of the Nazi regime (Trevor Ravenscroft, Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier u. a.).

In the ideological SS underground of the post-War period and in the "SS mysticism" of the nineties, the mythical kingdom of Shambhala is seen as a sanctuary for an aggressive and morbid "Nazi religion" (Wilhelm Landig, Jan van Helsing u. a.).

The Shambhala myth is one of the ideological pillars of "esoteric Hitlerism". This is the worldwide, racist, occult doctrine of the Chilean diplomat, Miguel Serrano, and the Indian by adoption, Savitri Devi ("Hitler’s Priestess")

With his concept of the Shambhala warrior, the now deceased Tibetan Lama, Chögyam Trungpa (1940-1987), laid the first foundations for a potential "Combative Buddhism", already found in large parts of East Asia, in the West. Instead of monasteries, Trungpa’s Shambhala warriors live in military camps, meditation is accompanied by military parades, in place of the begging bowl his pupils carry weapons and rather than monastic robes they wear military uniforms. The master himself no longer moved around in Buddhist style, with yellow and red monastic robe and walking staff and sandals, but rather rode forth on a white horse (in accordance with the apocalyptic prophecy of the Kalachakra Tantra) in peaked cap, tunic and high boots. The Shambhala coat of arms can be seen on the saddle of a horse in a photo of the martial Trungpa.

The Shambhala Myth provides the ideological basis for the terrorism of the Japanese apocalyptic guru, Shoko Asahara. He derives his apocalyptic visions from the teachings of the Kalachakra Tantra. His intention is to accelerate the onset of the Shambhala war and this is his justification for his poison-gas attacks on the Tokyo Underground. Asahara was the first leader of a sect to make the "uninvolved " from outside of his own organization the target of his deadly attacks and thus opened the floodgates for the religiously motivated international terrorism that has become the number one topic in the world community.


Even if these fascist and terrorist interpretations of the Shambhala myth are erroneous, it is therefore all the more pressing that the XIV Dalai Lama and his followers lay bare the Kalachakra ritual in all its detail, correct possible distortions, projections and misuses, and distance themselves publicly from its more problematic contents, that or edit them out of the traditional texts. Instead, however, there have in the past been numerous friendly meetings between the Tibetan religious leader and former SS figures (Heinrich Harrer, Bruno Beger), the founder of "esoteric Hitlerism", Miguel Serrano, and the terrorist, Shoko Asahara, whom even after the Tokyo attacks he described as his "friend, albeit an imperfect one”. Only later did he distance himself from him. It is the duty of the city of Graz, the provincial government of Styria, the various political factions, the media, the intellectuals and not least the Christian institutions, to begin a broad public discussion of this ritual, so as not be drawn into something which is diametrically opposed to their original intentions.

Then, according to statements in numerous international media reports, Tibetan Buddhism is the "trend religion" of our time. Through the XIV Dalai Lama, through both his charismatic appearances and his ostensibly humanist speeches and writings, a gigantic, unreflective cultural import of Eastern concepts into the West is taking place, one which displays fundamentalist characteristics and serves as an ideological foundation for various fundamentalist camps and can continue to so serve in the future. The Buddhist leader appeals to people’s deep need for harmony and peace, but the history of Lamaism itself, the contents of the Tibetan tantras and their complex of rituals, even the conditions which prevail among the Tibetans in exile, are anything but peaceful and harmonic. There are passages in the Kalachakra Tantra which brazenly call for a "war of the religions", which are intolerant and aggressive. In Tibetan Buddhism we have an archaic, magic-based religious system, which has remained to a large extent untouched by the fundamentals of the Western Enlightenment. This is also the reason it is so attractive for right-wing extremists. For centuries it has led to social injustices that any freedom-loving citizen of today would be forced to reject. The equality of the sexes, democratic decision making and ecumenical movements are in themselves foreign to the nature of Tantric Buddhism, although the XIV Dalai Lama publicly proclaims the opposite.

In a reaction to 11 September 2001, Der Spiegel drew attention to aggressive elements and fundamentalist currents in the three monotheistic religions in an article entitled "Religious Mania – The Return of the Middle Ages". As is so often the case in such cultural critiques, Buddhism was spared. This is untrue! All of the topics criticized in this article (battles against unbelievers and dissidents, religious wars, armament fantasies, theocratic visions of power, apocalyptic predictions, misogyny, etc.) are to be found in a particularly concentrated degree in the Kalachkra Tantra.

The Critical Forum Kalachakra (CFK) demands that a wide-ranging cultural debate over the Kalachakra Tantra and the Shambhala myth. The CFK collects informations, distributes and translates documents.


This topic may be of interest to you:

THE BUDDHOCRATIC CONQUEST OF THE WEST

Other topics: The Shadow of the Dalai Lama – Contents
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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:33 pm 
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lpc, thank you. Most interesting links. Have glanced through them but will read them in detail when time allows. Much appreciated.


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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 5:08 pm 
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elle wrote:
lpc, thank you. Most interesting links. Have glanced through them but will read them in detail when time allows. Much appreciated.


Don’t mention. I thought they could be interesting to researchers on Tibetan Buddhism like you. Blinded by prejudice or fear of China, too many westerners, especially those in the media, just accept the Dalai Lama and his claims at face value. They may not know what they are dealing with. Have a nice day!

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 Post subject: Re: Can China apply western indigenous policy in Tibet, Xinjiang
PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:54 am 
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lpc1998, I have read the links, thanks as it is the darker side of Tibetan Buddhism. It is quite sinister and frightening. Fortunately Tibetan Buddhism is not a major force to be concerned about compared to the threat of Islam. The numbers alone is what makes Islam so dangerous, yet people are ignorant of the real threat because they cannot be bothered to read and research the fundamental issues at stake.


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