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 Post subject: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinjiang
PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:00 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 11:04 pm
Posts: 421
The way to go for an insightful and enlightened government. Some outsiders may criticise this as authoritarianism, disrespectful and intolerant for diversity of minorities and discrimination.

Of course:
Quote:
" The government strongly denies committing any abuses in Xinjiang and insists the legal, cultural and religious rights of Uighurs ...

While Uighurs have traditionally practiced a more relaxed form of Islam, the popularity of veils for women in particular has grown in recent years in what experts say is an expression of opposition to Chinese controls.".


Ethnic minorities, especially the Uighurs, enjoy special treatment in education sponsorship and admission to top universities with only half the criteria points met. They used to be the only ones exempted from one child policy to their advantage. Learn from history that Turkic peoples though numerous now, are not the first migrants to China in the Northwest region, and have no autonomy and dominance over other ethnic groups living there. Traditional ethnic costumes are bright and colourful and does not require donning opaque veils.

When clemency and privileges don't work, it is time to standardise the rule of law and make it clear what is legal and what is dangerous. Critics are caught in a chicken-or-egg problem.
Certainly religious radicalisation has heightened tension and contributed to violence. Those who cite extremism as a reaction to Chinese controls are confusing the sequence. Which happens first? Riots led to firmer controls - this is logical.

Chinese professionals, businessmen and officials would be safer with enforcement of stricter rules.

http://www.reuters.com/article/china-xinjiang-int-idUSKBN1710DD


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:10 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 11:04 pm
Posts: 421
What is "Han defined norms" Professor? This is universal. Check with all security agencies first before blindly protecting terrorists who kill other innocent people and work on separatism with foreign aid.
When a certain group demands everyone to bow and bend towards its rules but would violate all other rules to protect the citizens and larger community, it is unfair and morally wrong.

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/2083479/ban-beards-and-veils-chinas-xinjiang-passes-regulation

The list shows religious extremism should be banned.

The new law lists 15 types of comments or behaviour that the government views as extremism, covering a wide range of daily life.

Among them: using religious instead of legal procedures to marry or divorce or meddling in other people’s weddings, funerals and inheritance; interfering with or sabotaging the enforcement of family planning policies, and ­deliberately damaging national identity cards, household registration books or the currency. ­Applying the concept of Halal in non-food-related areas or using it to intervene in other people’s secular lives is also considered an extremist act ...


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:46 pm
Posts: 2480
Location: Australia
Maybe the Chinese government got this right. All ethnic groups are considered Chinese. There are no problems with 100 over ethnic groups in China, only some extremist Tibetans and Uyghur.

Some governments would be envious. There is much resistance among Australian public to amend the protection of minorities because it is too broad and general that it covers law abiding groups and the likes of Pauline Hanson could use this as endorsement for discrimination. If only liberal democratic governments have the will, wisdom and power to identify specific unacceptable practices it would be a smoother process to gain understanding and support to quell violence and improve stability.


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 11:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:47 am
Posts: 417
For romantics, people in utopia live on fresh air and free ideas, anything goes.
The bottomline is that the community's livelihood improves and there is greater good and safety.

Quote:
How do people in Xinjiang feel about this?

The Chinese government tightly controls access to the area.

Journalists are closely monitored when in the province, and sometimes are prohibited from accessing certain parts of the region all together. The same applies for non governmental organizations.

Leibold says the new security measures drive resentment underground and widens the gulf of misunderstanding and between the Chinese state and Uyghurs.

“This is an example of a surveillance society that we’ve never seen across China,” he said.

However, not all Xinjiang residents see Beijing’s security build-up as a problem.

“I don’t think they’re restrictions,” a 30-year-old Uyghur woman in Xinjiang’s Manasi County told CNN earlier this month on the condition of anonymity because she’s not authorized to speak to media by her employer. “I think the government is doing its job.”

She said while she’s noticed a steady influx of ethnic Han Chinese move into the region over the years, but she hasn’t felt discriminated — either in the Chinese school she attended or in her job as a nurse.

She added she didn’t mind attending the mandatory weekly flag raising ceremony, because it’s the same thing she did in school growing up, and thinks installing GPS in vehicles and other surveillance devices is for the greater good.

Dolkun Isa, Secretary General of the World Uyghur Congress (WUC), an exile group based in Germany, said that Chinese news coverage focuses on violence perpetrated by a tiny fraction of the population and “this shapes how some view Uyghurs generally — though clearly unfairly.”


http://fox6now.com/2017/04/01/why-china-is-banning-beards-and-veils-in-xinjiang/


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 11:09 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:47 am
Posts: 417
Beard is more than a symbol of culture, it is a religious requirement for Islamic faithfuls.
This is very seriously strict and scary. http://thewaytoakhirah.blogspot.com.au/ ... ay-to.html


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:21 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 5:51 pm
Posts: 2166
Location: East Midlands
The growing of beards is not a command of Allah nor is it stipulated a condition of being a Muslim in the Quran.
It is probably a token of defiance and a declaration of group identity by most Muslims.

"Are beards obligatory for devout Muslim men?
27 June 2010


Hizbul-Islam militants in Somalia ordered men in Mogadishu this week to grow their beards and trim their moustaches.
"Anyone found violating this law will face the consequences," a Hizbul-Islam militant said, announcing the edict.
But is growing a beard obligatory under Islam?
Professor Muhammad Abdel Haleem, of the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, says "this is not the only view expressed by Muslim scholars."
Many Muslim scholars now do not see the beard as an obligation and do shave their beards.
Recommendation
Muslims learn about the Prophet's views on facial hair not from the Koran, but through hadith - or sayings - attributed to Muhammad.
One such hadith, in a collection by Muslim scholar Muhammad al-Bukhari centuries ago, stipulates: "Cut the moustaches short and leave the beard."
The Prophet Muhammad is believed to have had a beard and those who insist that devout Muslims grow beards argue that they are doing no more than asking the faithful to emulate the Prophet's actions.
Iraqi Shia lawmaker Jamal Al-Deen
Image caption
Many Shia Muslims sport closely cropped beards
The question that arises is one of enforcement.
Mr Abdel Haleem, along with many other Muslim scholars, says the wearing of beards should be considered a recommendation rather than an obligation.
The Taliban, who ruled Afghanistan until they were ousted in 2001, and the Islamists of Somalia, are among a small minority in the Muslim world who demand unconditional observance and threaten penalties for non-compliance.
Mr Abdel Haleem argues that all practising Muslims - of which he is one - should be free to exercise their choice over a matter about which there is no overall consensus of opinion, without fear of retribution.
Imam Dr Abduljalil Sajid - an Islamic scholar and one of the founders of the Muslim Council of Britain - based at the Brighton Islamic Mission in the UK, concurs.
Going without a beard became a sign of modernity
Abduljalil Sajid, Imam
"In my opinion, this is a bit like the issue of women wearing headscarves. It is not one of the compulsory pillars of Islam, like prayer or fasting."
There are, however, schools of Islamic law - Hanafi, Maliki, Hanbali and Shafi - which, among many other things, hold strong positions on beard length and the act of shaving.
Followers of Shia Islam generally prefer closely cropped beards, which are mostly "like two, or three days' growth".
Most Islamic scholars or other figures of religious authority, whether Shia or Sunni, sport beards in emulation of the Prophet.
However Egypt, Jordan and Turkey are an exception, says Imam Abduljalil. In these countries you would find some scholars without beards.
"Going without a beard became a sign of modernity," the imam explains. "In the 1960s and 1970s, you saw more Muslims shaving off their beards."
But for those who want to follow the sayings of the Prophet to the letter, the hadith, Imam Abduljalil says, offers guidelines on "how to trim your beard and keep it looking beautiful."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/10369726


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2017 4:30 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:46 pm
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Location: Australia
Rough and crude way of identifying radicals and targeting profile of potential terrorists, but nevertheless, a starting point.

Should we be more patient with those on a different time scale and priorities? Not if they cause instability.


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 Post subject: Re: China rules on beards, veils to combat extremism in Xinj
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 5:51 pm
Posts: 2166
Location: East Midlands
orange blossom wrote:
Rough and crude way of identifying radicals and targeting profile of potential terrorists, but nevertheless, a starting point.

Should we be more patient with those on a different time scale and priorities? Not if they cause instability.


Never tolerate Fascism. They will never moderate their demands.


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